Capital Campaign Priorities

Marist College launched its comprehensive capital campaign, the Campaign for Marist, publicly in November 2007, announcing a goal of $75 million. The launch followed an initial, silent phase during which $45 million was raised in gifts from trustees, friends, and alumni. The campaign goal was increased to $150 million following a bequest of $75 million that the College received from Raymond A. Rich in fall 2009. The campaign now has reached $149 million, or 99 percent, of its goal. (updated October 2011)

Campaign Graph

Money raised through the campaign will go toward improving every facet of the institution, with emphasis on a number of priorities.

The Marist Fund
Capital Projects
Endowed Scholarships
Faculty Chairs
Centers of Excellence
Campus Ministry and Community Service

For information about how to become involved with and/or support the Campaign for Marist, please contact the Office of College Advancement at (845) 575-3863.

The Marist Fund

The Marist Fund, the College’s annual giving program, advances Marist's highest priorities each year. Without Marist Fund support, the College would not be able to provide current students with the opportunities that make Marist a top college. Marist Fund dollars do more than bridge the gap between tuition and operating expenses. They provide scholarship support to deserving students; bolster faculty innovation; create new programs and services for all Marist students; inspire students through important internship opportunities; allow students to experience another country’s culture by studying abroad; increase Marist's alumni participation rate; and continue to provide state-of-the-art technology throughout the campus. Programs supported by the Marist Fund can change a Marist student's life forever. (return to top of page)

Capital Projects

On October 6, 2007, a new chapter in Marist Athletics began with the dedication of Tenney Stadium at Leonidoff Field. The stadium's name honors Tim Tenney, CEO of Pepsi-Cola of the Hudson Valley, who provided the lead gift for the stadium renovation project. The Marist football, men's soccer, women's soccer, men's lacrosse and women's lacrosse programs call the stadium home.

The fall of 2007 also brought about newly renovated chemistry labs, creating state-of-the-art labs with cutting-edge equipment and attractive faculty office and student service space. The number of student lab spaces was increased from 32 to 48, and windows were installed on one end of the labs to provide natural light and a view from the Donnelly corridor into the renovated labs. The new space also includes lab stations for disabled students, a computational chemistry lab, and enhanced laboratory exhaust systems. Each lab station has compressed air, a laptop computer, and a snorkel exhaust device. The School of Science faculty are extremely pleased with the final outcome, since the new lab provides space and equipment to engage students in complex teaching and research activities.

On the east side of the campus, the Lower Fulton Townhouses opened in fall 2008 to replace residence hall rooms lost by dismantling Benoit and Gregory. The townhouses join three similar developments east of Route 9, all a short walk to the center of campus. They offer 264 beds in seven buildings.

Renovations were completed in 2009 on Marist's historic Cornell Boathouse - a two-story building with a functional boathouse on the first floor and event/meeting space on the second floor. Built in 1890, the boathouse provides a beautiful venue for campus gatherings. The boathouse was once occupied by Cornell University’s crews during their annual training and racing at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association National Championship Regatta. The regatta took place in Poughkeepsie from the late 19th century until 1950. In October of 2009, a similar regatta took place, named the Poughkeepsie Regatta, in celebration of the 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson's voyage up the Hudson River.

The boathouse project was part of a waterfront revitalization that included development of 12-acre Longview Park. The park features a new bulkhead and dock system, scenic river walks, renovated green space, new landscaping, and a hilltop pavilion.

Sixteen capital projects totaling $2.1 million were completed during the summer of 2009. Among the key projects undertaken was the expansion of the Health Services Center to accommodate Counseling Services and our Health Services staff, which has seen a significant increase in the number of students treated each year. The creation of the Health and Wellness Center allows us to provide enhanced service to our students in a new space that includes an attractive reception and waiting room, six exam rooms, a triage room, and five offices for counselors.

Another important summer project was the renovation of the Student Center Cabaret. This redesign has increased the integration between the Cabaret and the former commuter lounge, while at the same time greatly improving the space’s aesthetics and functionality. The new design includes beautiful architectural woodwork, acoustical treatments, new carpeting and furniture, and a state-of-the-art projection system.

Completed in spring 2011 and dedicated May 6, 2011, the $35 million Hancock Center was designed by the firm of architect Robert A. M. Stern, dean of the Yale School of Architecture. Approximately 57,000 square feet, the new building was designed to be sensitive to the environment. It has a green roof and an energy-efficient lighting system and was constructed using sustainable building practices and materials.

The Hancock Center houses the School of Computer Science and Mathematics, the nationally renowned Marist Institute for Public Opinion, the School of Management's high-tech Student Investment Center, the Marist-IBM Joint Study, the Institute for Data Center Professionals, Marist International Programs, and the College's academic administration. Several of the offices and laboratories in the new building have been designed for use by entrepreneurs for economic development and business incubation. The Hancock Center also features a National Science Foundation-funded enterprise computing research laboratory, two additional computer labs, 30 faculty offices, seven classrooms, six seminar rooms, an executive presentation center, a student lounge, a coffee shop, and an outdoor patio facing the Hudson River. 

On October 19, 2011, the New York State Department of Transportation and Marist dedicated a new pedestrian underpass at Route 9 that provides a safe, direct link for those wishing to cross Route 9. NYSDOT constructed the underpass in 11 days, completing it on July 14, four days ahead of schedule. The underpass has also reduced traffic delays by minimizing vehicle stops. The project, which cost approximately $4.6 million, was opened August 25, 2011.

More projects that will enhance the collegiate experience for students are also in the works. The dining hall will be renovated, and the McCann Recreation Center is currently receiving a $7.5 million makeover. The 11,600 gross square foot addition will include men's and women's basketball locker rooms with a lounge, men's and women's basketball offices, a 21 person video viewing room, video editing rooms, and locker rooms for coaches and officials.

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Endowed Scholarships

Many of those students who might benefit most from a Marist College education are those least able to afford it. Marist has worked hard to ensure that it remains cost-competitive and that every qualified student who wants to attend can. But the College is not immune to the financial pressures affecting all institutions of higher education. To help meet its very important strategic goal of creating a more diverse and international college community, Marist seeks to widen its pool of endowed scholarships to provide ongoing support to academically talented students of need. These endowed scholarships can ease the financial burden for many students. For others, these scholarships are the difference between being able to enroll at Marist and having to take their smarts and skills elsewhere, depriving both the student and the campus community.
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Faculty Chairs

As with students, competition for the best professors in all disciplines is increasingly intense. Marist is committed to ensuring that faculty compensation keeps pace with the College’s competitors. Much of Marist’s academic success is due to teacher-scholars who are leaders in their fields and partners in the classroom, where they do more than teach—they inspire. Proof of their success is found in the number of prestigious teaching and research grants they have garnered, in the significant publications that have featured their work and, most important, in the success of Marist students. Increasing Marist’s endowment will aid efforts to attract and retain the best faculty through faculty chairs and endowed professorships. (return to top of page)

Centers of Excellence

As Marist continues to draw talented students and exceptional teacher-scholars, opportunities exist to match their collective expertise with the appropriate resources and focus both within new centers of excellence. The hallmarks of these centers are nationally recognized expertise; faculty and student research; and work that is shared for the public good. As Marist looks to establish these centers in each of the College’s seven schools, the nationally prominent Marist Institute for Public Opinion and Hudson River Valley Institute will set the high standard for success.
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Campus Ministry and Community Service

Marist is committed to sustaining and nurturing the tradition of service that is the legacy of the founding Marist Brothers and a core element of its mission. As with everything, success in this regard is best exhibited by Marist’s students, who bring a strong desire to serve and learn how best to put that desire into action by participating in numerous service programs on the campus, in the surrounding community, and around the world. Examples are many, including programs of Campus Ministry, student government, and other student clubs. High-profile efforts include Hunger Month, when money and awareness are raised and food collected to feed the area’s hungry, and the Giving Tree, which provides holiday gifts to local families in need. Less visible but no less meaningful is the ongoing volunteer work of Marist students in local schools and social service agencies. Marist seeks to establish long-term support to encourage and sustain these good works.
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