Course Descriptions


ANTHROPOLOGY:

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ANTH 102

Three Credits LA   Ethnology: An introduction to the nature, uniformity, and diversity of cultures through an exploration of people in different times and regions.  Topics include: the family, economics, political systems, religion, social stratification, and arts and crafts.  

BIOLOGY:

Topics in Biology  BIOL 101

Three Credits LA This course is designed to introduce the non-science major to the major principles in biology and then to utlize these principles to discuss science-related concerns of today's society. 

Topics in Nutrition BIOL 225 (Dual listed as HLTH 225)

Three Credits LA This course is designed for non-science majors to learn scientifically supported as well as traditional approaches to nourishing and healing the body which can be incorporated into personal, daily, good health practices.  An emphasis is placed on multicultural, political, and ecological dimensions of dietary choices.  They concept of food as medicine and the concept of diet as a critical component in healing are fundamental to this course.  Included are the exploration of herbal medicine, environmental health, and healing choices.   Students also will develop the skills and understanding to analyze, compare, and contrast dietary choices for personal health. 

COMPUTING STUDIES:

Technology for the 21st Century CSIS 103

Three Credits LA This hands-on course will provide students with an overview of the types of information resources found in libraries and with a working knowledge of the electronic resources available in the Marist College Library.  In addition, information available via the Internet and the World Wide Web will be explored.  Search techniques will be demonstrated and practiced.  Critical thinking and evaluation of information resources will be emphasized throughout the course.   The impact of the use and availability of information locally, nationally, and globally will be discussed.  MLA and APA citation style will be used.  Students will learn "when" and "why" to use computer skills as well as "how."  Students will develop information and computer literacy by applying various computer skills as part of the learning process.   

BUSINESS: 

Economics of Social Issues ECON 150

Three Credits LA  This is an issues-oriented course that introduces essential economic principles  and applies them to an array of important social questions. The course is designed  to reveal how economics enables us to understand the analysis behind headlines  and news stories about current events and policy questions. Concepts and issues  from both microeconomics and macroeconomics will be addressed. This course  is designed as a one-semester overview of economic principles for students in
majors other than business, economics, and accounting. 

ENGLISH:

College Writing II ENG 117

Three Credits LA  This course instructs the students in the conventions of academic writing at the college level.  Greater emphasis is placed at this level on synthesizing ideas from diverse readings into more complex essays.  Students are instructed in the conventions of scholarly documentation and complete one or more essays based on research beyond the course text.  Students may, on the basis of entering test scores, be placed immediately into the course.  All students must take a college-wide proficiency exam upon completion of College Writing II.

American Literature I   ENG210

Three Credits LA  Introduces students to a number of New World writers, from 1620 to the Civil War, placing these in the context of significant historical and intellectual movements. The course begins with Colonial writers such as Bradford, Taylor, Rowlandson, and Bradstreet, moves to the 18th-century figures such as Edwards and Franklin, and culminates with writers of the American Renaissance: Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Melville.

American Literature II  ENG 211

Three Credits LA  Introduces students to a number of significant American writers from the Civil War to the mid-20th century. The course begins with Whitman and includes late 19th-century writers such as Dickinson, Twain, James, Freeman, Jewett, and Adams. Readings from a variety of early 20th-century novelists, essayists, poets, and playwrights will be selected, e.g., from Chopin, Lewis, Faulkner, Gilman, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Cather, Anderson, Eliot, Williams, O’Neill, Baldwin.

Literature and Gender ENG 220

Three Credits LA  This course will examine literary texts with special emphasis on gender issues.  Questions may be raised, for instance, about gender definitions and roles, gender and language, gender as a locus of economic, political, social, or literary power. Topics will vary from semester to semester. The course may be organized around a group of writers, a historical period or movement, a genre, a theme, or a combination of these.

Introduction to Literature: Fiction and Poetry ENG 255

Three Credits LA  This course seeks to increase students’ ability to understand, enjoy, and appreciate complex literary works of fiction and poetry—doing so in good part by acquainting them with a set of concepts and terms that allow them to observe and describe some of the main literary resources employed by poets and fiction writers to convey meaning.

 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & POLICY:

Introduction to Environmental Issues ENSC 101

Three Credits LA  Examines natural systems, adverse impacts of human activities upon these systems, and how society deals with these impacts. Topics may include ecology; biodiversity; forests and deforestation; human population growth and control; food production and world hunger; energy resources; and water and air pollution.  In addition to the science of these topics, related politics, economics, and ethics are discussed.

HEALTH:

Topics in Nutrition HLTH 225 (Dual listed as BIOL 225)

Three Credits LA  This course is designed for non-science majors to learn scientifically supported as well as traditional approaches to nourishing and healing the body which can be incorporated into personal, daily, good health practices. An emphasis is placed on multicultural, political, and ecological dimensions of dietary choices. The concept of food as medicine and the concept of diet as a critical component in healing are fundamental to this course. Included are the exploration of herbal medicine, environmental health, and healing choices. Students also will develop the skills and understanding to analyze, compare, and contrast dietary choices for personal health.  

HISTORY:

Themes in Modern History HIST 101

Three Credits LA  This course is designed to help students acquire knowledge of the past and an understanding of how the past has been represented and interpreted by historians. A variety of historical narratives and perspectives may be examined that offer insight into the development of the complex modern world. Themes to be covered will include, but are not limited to: the development of capitalism, industrialization, political revolutions, colonization, war, social movements, migration and immigration, decolonization, and globalization.

New York: The Empire State  HIST 220

Three Credits LA  This course examines the development and rise of New York from its pre-colonial beginnings through the present day. Emphasis will be placed on Native- American and European contact, the significance of the region to the American Revolution, the emergence of the state as the nation’s leading economic power, and the economic, political, and cultural importance of New York City in the 20th century.

America Since 1945 HIST 228

Three Credits LA  This course begins with a review of the cumulative influences of the Great Depression, New Deal, and World War II on American institutions, values, and behaviors. Tracing the effects of these events through the 40s and 50s, attention is given to cold war politics and foreign policies. The sections on the 60s and 70s focus on themes of black civil rights, women’s equality, and minority politics.

MATHEMATICS:

Introductory Statistics I MATH 130

Three Credits LA  This course introduces the basic ideas and techniques of statistics including: descriptions of sample data; simple probability; the binomial and normal distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; and the chi-squared distribution. Use of the computer or a T1-83 graphing calculator may be required. This course is offered every semester. Note: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed MATH 330.  Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics.

 PHILOSOPHY:

World Views and Values PHIL 103

Three Credits LA  This course will help students to ask basic questions about the ultimate meaning of life, to take a comprehensive and holistic world view, and to articulate a coherent values system. The basic methodology for teaching the course is comparative and socio-analytic.

POLITICAL SCIENCE:

Introduction to Global Issues POSC 103

 Three Credits LA  This course is intended as an introduction to the geography, vocabulary, and perspectives needed to understand the evolution of our global community, the challenges that we face in the 21st century, and different approaches for managing those challenges. It takes a historical perspective, focusing on the effects of colonialism and the complex encounter it provoked between non-Western and Western societies. It also addresses an array of interrelated global issues that we face in the post-colonial period, including cultural and religious diversity, human rights, economic development, ecological sustainability, and the possibilities and challenges of international conflict and cooperation.

 American National Government POSC 110

 Three Credits LA  This course is a study of the American political system, and analysis of the institutions of the national government and of the American political process. Political behavior and selected issue areas will also be studied.

PSYCHOLOGY:

Introduction to Psychology PSYC 101

Three Credits LA  This course includes the fundamental treatment of the basic research findings and theories comprising the science of psychology. Topics of study include the exploration of the nature, scope, and methods involved in the scientific investigation of human behavior, stressing such topics as learning, emotions, personality, assessment, psychopathology, sensation, perception, and psychological therapies.

 RELIGIOUS STUDIES:

Introduction to Religion REST 107

Three Credits LA  This course examines the origin theories, rituals, beliefs, and ethics of ancient religions. Patterns and similarities are explored in religious traditions from archaic times to the present. Students will also study the structural and ethical differences between ancient and modern religions. To help develop analytic skills, students will utilize various approaches to the study of religion, including historical, theological, ethnological, and psychological methodologies.  

World Religions REST 209

Three Credits LA  This course is an introduction to the major religious traditions and movements of the world and their relation to the cultures in which they developed. This survey course emphasizes the universality of religious experience and considers the impact of religion on the world.

SOCIOLOGY:

Introduction to Sociology SOC 101

Three Credits LA  Students are introduced to three major sociological theories, conflict, functionalism, and symbolic interactionism, within an ongoing holistic analysis of contemporary society. Emphasis is on how the major social institutions, the economy, government, education, religion, and the family, profoundly shape individuals’ personal identities and everyday lives.

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