About the Library

MAIN ENTRANCE: SECOND FLOOR

James A. Cannavino Library

The Cannavino Library was completed in 2000 and is the architectural and intellectual center of the campus. It contains materials in a variety of formats including: Over 207,000 volumes, over 30,000 scholarly journals, newspapers and periodicals, and some 5,000 audio-visual items in DVD and other formats.

The building is wireless and houses several computer labs as well as laptops that can be borrowed for use in the Library.

The Library coffee shop serves as a meeting place as well as an area where students enjoy working on their laptops and reading.

Just inside the Library are the circulation and reference desks where librarians are always on duty to provide services to students and other members of the Marist community.

The Library is open more hours than the undergraduate libraries at either Stanford or Cornell.

There are collaborative rooms equipped with computers on both the first and the third floors where students can work together on class projects.

The Library also has a Research Center offering in-depth one-on-one sessions to help the student better understand how to access all the different resources both on the shelves and on the Internet.

THIRD FLOOR

In addition to collaborative rooms, individual and group work areas, and classrooms, the third floor houses a number of academic support services including the Center for Career Services, the Writing Center, Marist International Programs, the Academic Learning Center, and the Center for Multicultural Affairs.

The Library's third floor is also home to the Joint Study---a permanent research project conducted by Marist and IBM to find ways that technology can further serve the teaching and learning process at Marist.

The Office of Academic Technology is where faculty can work with specialized staff to design web-based material for both campus-based courses and distance learning.

FIRST FLOOR

The first floor of the Library contains the open stacks for books, public computers, and a variety of work spaces. It is also where the Archives and Special Collections is located that among its holdings include the papers of Lowell Thomas and important collections that document the earliest days of the environmental movement.