Ed Smith, Professor of Art, Director of the Steel Plant Art Gallery

"Ulysses"
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

It little profits that an idle king,
By this still hearth, among these barren crags,
Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,
That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
I cannot rest from travel: I will drink
Life to the lees: All times I have enjoy'd
Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those
That loved me, and alone, on shore, and when
Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades
Vext the dim sea: I am become a name;
For always roaming with a hungry heart
Much have I seen and known; cities of men
And manners, climates, councils, governments,
Myself not least, but honour'd of them all;
And drunk delight of battle with my peers,
Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy.

Read the full poem

I love this poem because I live with my friends Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, Plutarch, Ovid, etc. They take up my days and nights.
And I remember Aeschylus, who wanted nothing more than to be remembered for his heroic participation at Marathon.

edit