Name: Dr. Patricia Tarantello
Title: Visiting Lecturer of English
Office Location: Fontaine 207
Extension: (845) 575-3000 ext. 2178
Email: patricia.f.tarantello@marist.edu
Degrees Held:

Ph.D. & M.A. in English, Fordham University, Bronx, NY

  • Dissertation: “Advertising Authorship: Writers, Publicity, and American Literary Culture, 1720-1830”

B.A. with a major in English (literature and writing concentrations), Marist College

 

Certifications:

Online Teaching Certification, Marist College

Bio:

Interests:

Composition and Rhetoric

Close Reading and Literary Analysis

American Literature

Feminist and Gender Theory

Castaway Narratives

Digital Humanities 

Awards & Honors:

Publications:

"Insisting on Femininity: Mercy Otis Warren, Susanna Rowson, and Literary Self-Promotion." Women's Studies vol. 46, no. 3, Spring 2017, pp. 181-199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00497878.2017.1287077.

“Persona-lly Appealing: Benjamin Franklin’s Poor Richard and Authorial Self-Representation.” Authorship vol. 5, no. 1, Summer 2016. http://www.authorship.ugent.be/article/view/2353.

Exhibitions:
Research Interests:
Conferences & Workshops:

“Joel Barlow: Patriotism, Patronage, and Publicity.” Northeast Modern Language Association Conference, Hartford, Connecticut. March 2015.

 

“Misogynistic Melodies: Negative Portrayals of Women in the American Music Industry.” Chair for a panel of student presenters, Women and Society Conference, Marist College, Poughkeepsie, New York. October 2015.

 

“The Domestic Perspective: Mercy Otis Warren’s Promotion of Herself as a Female Historian.” Women and Society Conference, Marist College, Poughkeepsie, New York. October 2014.

 

“Advertising Image: Samuel Keimer’s Unsuccessful Public Persona.” Advertising in Early America Conference at the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Nov 2011.

 

“Publicizing Particularities: Susanna Rowson’s Strategies of Self-Promotion.” Gender, the Body, and Technology Conference, Roanoke, Virginia. April 2010.

 

“Advertising Authorship: Writers, Publicity, and American Literary Culture, 1720-1830.”  Futures of American Studies Institute, Dartmouth University in Hanover, New Hampshire.  June 2009.

 

 “‘Tis easy to see, hard to foresee’: Benjamin Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Almanack and the Cultivation of American Identity.” Fordham University Graduate English Association Conference, in New York. October 2008.

Affiliations:

Sigma Tau Delta (English Honor Society)

Marist Ally Network

Women's Studies Program

Presentations:
Miscellaneous: