School of Professional Programs

Career Skills Modules

The School of Professional Programs (SPP) has developed a series of Career Skills Modules (CSM) designed to provide working managers and professionals with the essential skills necessary to advance their careers. 

What is a module?

A module consists of three college courses. Modules cover a range of topics addressing organizational skills and activities that are available in two levels for each topic (Part I and Part II).  The second module in each area builds additional skills based on the content of the first module.

What is a course?

Each course within a module is worth three undergraduate Marist credits. At three courses in each module, this equals nine college credits.

Are these courses only applicable in these career skills modules?

All courses completed within the modules can be applied towards earning a Professional Studies undergraduate degree at Marist (either as a first or second undergraduate degree).

Is this affordable?

Yes!  Tuition is designed to be highly compatible with the typical employee tuition reimbursement benefit policies at many organizations.

Choose From Eight Diverse Topics

Organizational Leadership

Part I

  • ORG 101:Managing Organizations (3 credits): This course provides an introduction to the management of organizations. Students will learn about organizational structures, the history of management, and the tasks, roles, and responsibilities of managers. Planning, organizing, directing, and controlling the management process will also be discussed. Critical and ethical thinking will be emphasized throughout this course.
  • ORG 302: Behaviors in Organizations (3 credits): The field of organizational behavior explores the operations, human resources, and communication styles within business, community, and other types of organizations. This course provides a foundation for understanding organizational behavior at the individual, group, and organizational level. Students will examine current research, various theories, models, and contemporary issues in the field to understand better the way that organizations work or don’t work. Collaborative learning through the application of theory to real-life organizations will be emphasized in this course.
  • ORG 321: Issues in Leadership (Prerequisite: ORG 302; 3 credits): This course examines both the theoretical and practical aspects of leadership focusing on the role of the leader within business and community organizations. Leadership will be examined from historical, cultural, ethical and psychological perspectives with an emphasis on the changing nature of effective leadership in a global business environment. Students will have an opportunity to examine and develop their own personal leadership styles and potentials through collaborative and experiential learning experiences.

Part II 

(Prerequisite: Organizational Leadership Career Skills Module Part I)

  • ORG 301: Managing Human Resources (3 credits): This course gives the student an overview of the broad subject of human resources management and an in-depth exposure to the key areas of this critical function. The most successful organizations know that human resources must operate at the strategic level, along with finance and law, the other core staff functions. The meaning of a strategic approach is explored in depth, providing a solid grounding in what management of human resources requires in today’s diverse, litigious, downsizing-prone, tough, often controversial world of organizational life.
  • ORG 322: Leadership in the Global Workplace(Prerequisite: ORG 100 or ORG 101 or ORG 301 or ORG 302; 3 credits): A leader’s ability to approach diversity from a perspective that can use individual differences to empower followers is becoming increasingly important in the global workplace. This course introduces students to the changing role of leadership within multicultural and multinational organizations while identifying the leadership skills necessary for preparing organizations for success in globally diverse environments.
  • ORG 421: Strategic Leadership & Innovation(Prerequisite: ORG 321 or ORG 322; 3 credits): Understanding where to look for new ideas, how to nurture them, and how they can be used to maintain a strategic advantage, is vital to the success of an organization. This course examines the need for strategic leadership as well as the relationship between creativity and innovation in the context of modern organizations. Students will learn how to initiate creativity in their organizations and how to recognize and overcome obstacles to the creative process.

Organizational Communication

Part I 

  • COM 102: Introduction to Communication (3 credits): This course surveys the theories of communication relevant to all contexts – from conversations between friends and family to presidential town halls on the Internet. It introduces students to essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the process, function, natures, and effects of communication.
  • COM 203: Interpersonal Communication (3 credits): An examination of the ways in which people communicate through verbal and nonverbal symbols, the processes by which the receiver interprets messages, the effects of communication upon relationships, and the environmental and cultural conditions that affect communication. Intrapersonal and interpersonal communication are studied to help the student improve his or her own skills and to provide a foundation in basic communication theory.
  • COM 270: Organizational Communication (Prerequisite: COM 102; 3 credits): This course is concerned with communication processes within an organization. It focuses on the sending, the receiving and the interpreting of messages. Principles of downward, upward and lateral systems are investigated. Case studies are employed to illustrate typical problems that arise and the methodologies devised for successful resolutions to achieve effective communication.

Part II

(Prerequisite: Organizational Communications Career Skills Module: Part I)

  • COM 211: Fundamentals of Public Relations Theory & Practice (Prerequisite: COM 102; 3 credits): This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of public relations from a theoretical and a strategic management perspective. Specifically, the course will help students trace the history and development of the field; critically assess the role of public relations in modern societies; develop an understanding of theoretical concepts and practical techniques of public relations in interpersonal and organizational communication; and evaluate the relationships between public relations, journalism, advertising, marketing, and other communication disciplines in modern societies.
  • COM 302: Persuasion (3 credits): A study of contemporary theories of persuasive message design in mediated and interpersonal contexts. The course examines the roles played by language, culture, message content, and media in persuasion. Students analyze a variety of persuasive artifacts, learn how to detect deception, and learn how to construct effective persuasive messages.
  • COM 301: Small Group Communication (Prerequisite: COM 203; 3 credits): An investigation of the theories and processes of communication within small groups. Students work in small groups to integrate theory with experience.

Information Technology Management

Part I

  • ORG 100: Exploring Business & Management (3 credits): This course examines fundamental issues in the world of business and the practice of management. It is designed to be an interactive and lively experience that provides students with a theoretical background of how organizations work and the role of management in organizations. Some of the areas and issues that will be covered include: the role of managers, the history of managerial thought, planning and problem-solving, individual responsibility, and the ever-changing world of business in a global environment. Students will be challenged to apply theoretical learning to their own experiences in business and organizations, and to look at organizations as integrated and dynamic systems.
  • CMPT 130: Information Technology and Systems Concepts (3 credits): This course establishes a foundation for the understanding of information systems in organizations. Applications and technologies are studied in relation to organization objectives. The student studies different types of systems such as MIS, DSS, EIS and basic applications such as Manufacturing, Finance, and Marketing. The student studies an overview of technology including hardware, software, Internet, World Wide Web, e-Commerce, database, and objects.
  • CMPT 309: Project Management (3 credits): A fundamental comprehension of managing technical projects being necessary for today’s modern IT professionals, this course examines the project management discipline with a focus on technical, information based, and computer programming related project topics. Students will learn project management techniques and how to create usable project documentation. They will practice oral presentation skills used for providing stakeholders with status updates, collaboration skills for use in team settings, and perform project management tasks with a model project. Topics will also include the study of risk identification, management, and mitigation, critical thinking and problem solving. Students who complete the class will understand project management tools and their use, project management certifications that are available to be attained, and comprehend the role project management plays in the IT/IS industry.

Part II

(Prerequisite: Information Technology Management Career Skills Module: Part I)

  • CMPT 300: Management Information Systems (3 credits): This course establishes a foundation for the understanding of information systems in organizations. An identification and basic explanation of the systems point of view, the organization of a system, information flows, and the nature of information systems in organizations. The relationship between systems and information to organizational objectives is examined. Applications and technologies are studied in relation to organization objectives. The student studies different types of systems such as Management Information Systems, Decision Support Systems, Executive Information Systems, and Artificial Intelligence. Basic applications such as Manufacturing, Finance, and Marketing are also studied. Electronic Commerce, Internet business models, e-business, and the management of organizational transformations, driving the move toward digital firms, is examined. Team exercises and multiple case problems are used.
  • ORG 301: Managing Human Resources (3 credits): This course gives the student an overview of the broad subject of human resources management and an in-depth exposure to the key areas of this critical function. The most successful organizations know that human resources must operate at the strategic level, along with finance and law, the other core staff functions. The meaning of a strategic approach is explored in depth, providing a solid grounding in what management of human resources requires in today’s diverse, litigious, downsizing-prone, tough, often controversial world of organizational life.
  • ORG 322: Leadership in the Global Workplace (Prerequisite: ORG 100 or ORG 101 or ORG 301 or ORG 302; 3 credits): A leader’s ability to approach diversity from a perspective that can use individual differences to empower followers is becoming increasingly important in the global workplace. This course introduces students to the changing role of leadership within multicultural and multinational organizations while identifying the leadership skills necessary for preparing organizations for success in globally diverse environments.

Management Studies

Part I

  • ORG 100: Exploring Business & Management (3 credits): This course examines fundamental issues in the world of business and the practice of management. It is designed to be an interactive and lively experience that provides students with a theoretical background of how organizations work and the role of management in organizations. Some of the areas and issues that will be covered include: the role of managers, the history of managerial thought, planning and problem-solving, individual responsibility, and the ever-changing world of business in a global environment. Students will be challenged to apply theoretical learning to their own experiences in business and organizations, and to look at organizations as integrated and dynamic systems.
  • ORG 202: Global Issues in Business & Society (3 credits): This course examines the impact of major social, political, and cultural forces on the global business environment and marketplace. Students will gain a better understanding of how society and social issues affect the business world and vice versa. Ethical challenges, diversity issues, technology, environmental issues, and social responsibility will also be examined.
  • ORG 203: Fundamentals of Financial Accounting (3 credits): This course introduces students to the principles and concepts of financial accounting. Students will develop a basic understanding of business transactions and financial statements.

Part II

(Prerequisite: Management Studies Career Skills Module: Part I)

  • ORG 301: Managing Human Resources (3 credits): This course gives the student an overview of the broad subject of human resources management and an in-depth exposure to the key areas of this critical function. The most successful organizations know that human resources must operate at the strategic level, along with finance and law, the other core staff functions. The meaning of a strategic approach is explored in depth, providing a solid grounding in what management of human resources requires in today’s diverse, litigious, downsizing-prone, tough, often controversial world of organizational life.
  • ORG 321: Issues in Leadership (Prerequisite: ORG 100 or ORG 202 or ORG 302; 3 credits): This course examines both the theoretical and practical aspects of leadership focusing on the role of the leader within business and community organizations. Leadership will be examined from historical, cultural, ethical and psychological perspectives with an emphasis on the changing nature of effective leadership in a global business environment. Students will have an opportunity to examine and develop their own personal leadership styles and potentials through collaborative and experiential learning experiences.
  • ORG 421: Strategic Leadership & Innovation (Prerequisite: ORG 321 or ORG 322; 3 credits): Understanding where to look for new ideas, how to nurture them, and how they can be used to maintain a strategic advantage, is vital to the success of an organization. This course examines the need for strategic leadership as well as the relationship between creativity and innovation in the context of modern organizations. Students will learn how to initiate creativity in their organizations and how to recognize and overcome obstacles to the creative process.

Financial Management

Part I

  • ORG 203: Fundamentals of Financial Accounting (3 credits): This course introduces students to the principles and concepts of financial accounting. Students will develop a basic understanding of business transactions and financial statements.
  • ORG 204: Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting (Prerequisite: ORG 203; 3 credits): This course focuses on the analyzing and generating of accounting information to be used in the planning and control processes. Students will work with budgets, standards, cost systems, and financial statement analysis for organizations.
  • MATH 130: Introductory Statistics I (Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics or satisfactory performance on the Mathematics Placement Test; 3 credits): This course introduces the basic ideas and techniques of statistics including: descriptions of sample data; simple probability; the binomial and normal distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; and the chi-squared distribution. Appropriate technology will be selected by the instructor.

Part II

(Prerequisite: Financial Management Career Skills Module I)

  • ECON 103: Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits): A course dealing with the analysis of supply and demand. Topics covered include the basic functioning of a free-enterprise economy; the evolution of markets and institutions; price behavior under both competitive and monopolistic conditions; demand and utility; equilibrium of the firm; marginal analysis and production theory; returns to the factors of production.
  • ECON 104: Principles of Macroeconomics (Prerequisite: ECON 103; 3 credits): Topics covered include analysis of the determination of national income through the investigation of consumption, investment, government expenditures and net exports; analysis of the determinants of inflation and unemployment; the role of government in the economy including fiscal and monetary policies, market failures and public goods.
  • BUS 320: Financial Management (Prerequisites: ORG 203, MATH 130, ECON 103 and ECON 104; 3 credits): An introduction to the major topics in corporate finance. The course examines the time value of money, capital budgeting, financial analysis and forecasting, stock valuation, bond valuation, and the financial markets.

Marketing Communications

Part I

  • ORG 340: Foundations of Marketing (3 credits): This course introduces students to the role of marketing in organizations. Students will study all facets of the marketing process including: environmental analysis, marketing-information management, market research, consumer and business behavior, segmentation, and positioning. Students will also explore marketing from a global view (examining global market forces and globally competitive environments). Legal and ethical impacts of marketing will be explored through case studies.
  • COM 102: Introduction to Communication (3 credits): This course surveys the theories of communication relevant to all contexts – from conversations between friends and family to presidential town halls on the Internet. It introduces students to essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the process, function, natures, and effects of communication.
  • COM 211: Fundamentals of Public Relations Theory & Practice (Prerequisite: COM 102; 3 credits): This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of public relations from a theoretical and a strategic management perspective. Specifically, the course will help students trace the history and development of the field; critically assess the role of public relations in modern societies; develop an understanding of theoretical concepts and practical techniques of public relations in interpersonal and organizational communication; and evaluate the relationships between public relations, journalism, advertising, marketing, and other communication disciplines in modern societies.

Part II

(Prerequisite: Marketing Communication Career Skills Model: Part I)

  • COM 302: Persuasion (3 credits): A study of contemporary theories of persuasive message design in mediated and interpersonal contexts. The course examines the roles played by language, culture, message content, and media in persuasion. Students analyze a variety of persuasive artifacts, learn how to detect deception, and learn how to construct effective persuasive messages.
  • COM 347: Reputation and Relationship Management (Prerequisite: COM 211; 3 credits): This seminar course introduces students to a growing and increasingly important practice area within the public relations profession. Students will gain an understanding of the theoretical perspectives related to environmental scanning/surveillance and the strategic management of events, trends and issues as well as their impact on an organization’s relationships with key stakeholder groups. In addition, students will apply theory to practice by learning how to make, justify and assess the impact of organizational decisions on corporate image, reputation and trust.
  • ORG 322: Leadership in the Global Workplace (3 credits): A leader’s ability to approach diversity from a perspective that can use individual differences to empower followers is becoming increasingly important in the global workplace. This course introduces students to the changing role of leadership within multicultural and multinational organizations while identifying the leadership skills necessary for preparing organizations for success in globally diverse environments.

Project Management

Part I 

  • ORG 101: Managing Organizations (3 credits): This course provides an introduction to the management of organizations. Students will learn about organizational structures, the history of management, and the tasks, roles, and responsibilities of managers. Planning, organizing, directing, and controlling the management process will also be discussed. Critical and ethical thinking will be emphasized throughout this course.
  • CMPT 309: Project Management (3 credits): A fundamental comprehension of managing technical projects being necessary for today’s modern IT professionals, this course examines the project management discipline with a focus on technical, information based, and computer programming related project topics. Students will learn project management techniques and how to create usable project documentation. They will practice oral presentation skills used for providing stakeholders with status updates, collaboration skills for use in team settings, and perform project management tasks with a model project. Topics will also include the study of risk identification, management, and mitigation, critical thinking and problem solving. Students who complete the class will understand project management tools and their use, project management certifications that are available to be attained, and comprehend the role project management plays in the IT/IS industry.
  • ORG 302: Behaviors in Organizations (3 credits): The field of organizational behavior explores the operations, human resources, and communication styles within business, community, and other types of organizations. This course provides a foundation for understanding organizational behavior at the individual, group, and organizational level. Students will examine current research, various theories, models, and contemporary issues in the field to understand better the way that organizations work or don’t work. Collaborative learning through the application of theory to real-life organizations will be emphasized in this course.

Part II – UNDER DEVELOPMENT

(Prerequisite: Project Management Career Skills Module: Part I)

Human Resource Management

Part I

  • ORG 101: Managing Organizations (3 credits): This course provides an introduction to the management of organizations. Students will learn about organizational structures, the history of management, and the tasks, roles, and responsibilities of managers. Planning, organizing, directing, and controlling the management process will also be discussed. Critical and ethical thinking will be emphasized throughout this course.
  • ORG 302: Behaviors in Organizations (3 credits): The field of organizational behavior explores the operations, human resources, and communication styles within business, community, and other types of organizations. This course provides a foundation for understanding organizational behavior at the individual, group, and organizational level. Students will examine current research, various theories, models, and contemporary issues in the field to understand better the way that organizations work or don’t work. Collaborative learning through the application of theory to real-life organizations will be emphasized in this course.
  • ORG 301: Managing Human Resources (3 credits): This course gives the student an overview of the broad subject of human resources management and an in-depth exposure to the key areas of this critical function. The most successful organizations know that human resources must operate at the strategic level, along with finance and law, the other core staff functions. The meaning of a strategic approach is explored in depth, providing a solid grounding in what management of human resources requires in today’s diverse, litigious, downsizing-prone, tough, often controversial world of organizational life.

Part II– UNDER DEVELOPMENT

(Prerequisite: Human Resources Management Career Skills Module: Part I)