Page 13 - Marist Magazine Winter 2011-2012

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that night be able to do it in the show. It’s a
lot thrown at you, and it’s kind of stressful.”
The first night that DeSimone performed
in Lord of the Dance was in front of 15,000
people in Taipei. Later the crowds were even
larger: 33,000 in Paris, 22,000 in Detroit.
As the year went on, he became more
relaxed. “When you’re nervous about the steps
and don’t know them very well, hearing any
positive reaction from the audience is a huge
relief. Once you reach the point where you
can do the steps in your sleep, you get up there
and the people just flip out, especially after the
finale. When they call you back for an encore,
it’s the biggest adrenaline high.”
The g roup per formed in Ta iwan,
Portugal, Switzerland, France, Germany, the
Netherlands, the United States, Canada, and
Brazil. On days off, DeSimone and his friends
in the show went sightseeing.
“If there were a big city nearby that we
wanted to go to and weren’t going to get there
on tour, we would go there for the day. For
instance, when we toured in the Netherlands,
we went to Amsterdam.”
Missing school to be in the Lord of the
Dance was the least of DeSimone’s worries.
A biology education major with minors in
psychology and environmental science, he
stayed in contact with professors and did a
lot of reading while away.
Still, he says there was a lot to adjust to
coming back to Marist, getting back into the
routine of going to class and doing homework.
“I wanted to take more than a year off. It’s hard
to come back.”
So far he says his year is not going too
badly. When DeSimone returned to Marist, he
returned to Dance Ensemble. Before taking the
year off, he had choreographed Irish dance for
the ensemble. Back on campus this past fall,
he choreographed an Irish step piece for the
ensemble’s November show.
His assistance to Dance Ensemble shows
that he is really committed to what he does,
according to Dance Ensemble Show Committee
Manager Erin Graetzer ’13 and President
Arianna Cesa ’12. “Before he left, he choreo-
graphed a contemporary, high-energy Irish
step number that made the style of dance more
popular in our club,” says Graetzer. “He’s very
willing to work with all levels of dancers to
give them the opportunity to dance in an Irish
number. Having an Irish step number gives
our show diversity, as well as having a male
choreographer.”
“We’re happy to have him back,” says Cesa.
“His first semester that he choreographed, he
used a current song instead of traditional Irish
step music and everyone loved it. Ever since
then our Irish step pieces have been choreo-
graphed to current music and very popular in
our show. He works very well with his dancers
“When you’re nervous about the
steps and don’t know them very well,
hearing any positive reaction from
the audience is a huge relief.
Once you reach the point where
you can do the steps in your sleep,
you get up there and the people just
flip out, especially after the finale.
When they call you back for an encore,
it’s the biggest adrenaline high.”
One of the challenges was the preparation for the show. The male dancers had to learn 12
numbers within only a fewweeks.
and is always willing to work with beginners,
demonstrating a lot of patience and dedication
to our club.” He also teaches private lessons and
fills in for his dance teacher, Kevin Broesler.
There is dance in his future if he wants it.
He says Lord of the Dance has invited him to
come back after graduation and has offered
him an audition.
However, DeSimone now has other plans.
“I’ll probably only go back until I can find a job
teaching, and that’s only if I’m still fit enough
to dance at that stage. I’d like to teach high
school biology when I graduate.”
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