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Curriculum

The Department of Biology is committed to excellence in teaching, advising, undergraduate research, and service. We will provide challenging and innovative curricula that promote experiential learning opportunities such as internships, student-faculty collaborative research, and access to advanced technology. Our programs will prepare students for lifelong learning and for a diverse array of advanced studies and careers in the life sciences, including the health professions and teaching, making
them competitive for positions in top graduate and professional schools, secondary schools, and industry. We will contribute to the holistic education of all Marist students by fostering scientific literacy and critical-thinking skills that enhance their scientifically informed decisions. Faculty are committed to continual development as teacher-scholars, and to being active in research involving Marist students, with the goal of disseminating their findings to the scientific community. We will enhance student learning by improving and expanding our facilities and instrumentation. We will strengthen our integration with other School of Science programs, establish pedagogical and scholarly collaborations with colleagues within and outside of the College, and engage in service to the College and the greater community.

Chemistry Lab

 

 

Bachelor of Science in Biology

BIOL 130 General Biology I (4 credits)

This course is designed to introduce science majors to the major generalizations in biology. Topics include the scientific method, the chemical and cellular basis of life, energy transformation, DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, and cell division. The laboratory will emphasize hands-on exercises including such topics as data analysis, dissection, taxonomy and classification, and cell division.
<br>
<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week.</i>

BIOL 131 General Biology II (4 credits)

Designed to introduce science majors to fundamental concepts in biology. Topics include: transmission genetics, evolutionary theory, and selected ecological principles along with an examination of science as a process and the distinction between science and religion. The laboratory will emphasize experimental design, genetics, evolution and animal diversity. 

<br>
<i> Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 211 Plant Biology (4 credits)

An introduction to the basic interrelationships of plant structure, function,growth, reproduction, physiology, hormonal regulation and response to external stresses are presented in an evolutionary and ecological context. Plant natural products, their poisonous, medicinal and therapeutic active constituents will be covered. Laboratory will introduce knowledge and methodologies from a number of different disciplines to provide students with an experimental approach from the organismal to the molecular level. 

<br>
<i> Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 320 Genetics (4 credits)

A study of transmission, population, molecular, and cytogenetics. Both in the classroom and the laboratory, the emphasis is on reinforcing basic concepts through a study of the classic experiments in genetics as well as current research. 

<br>

<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

SCI 477 Science, Medicine and Ethics (3 credits)

This course addresses the moral implications of some of the recent advances in science and medicine. Major ethical approaches to making responsible decisions are explained by the case-study method.

Biology Elective Courses (14 credits) (Listed at the bottom of the page)

Select from 300-400 level courses in BIOL (at least two of which must have a lab) and not including internships, research, BIOL 320, 390, 391, and/or 392. Taking both BIOL 201 and BIOL 202 (Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II) may substitute for <b>one</b> 300-400 level 4-credit BIOL course, but then BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440 may not be taken for Biology or Related Fields Elective credit. Students who take BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440 may not take BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202 for Biology or Related Fields Elective credit.

 
For additional information including other course requirements, recommended program sequence, or pre-requisites,
please refer to the catalog.

Bachelor of Science in Biology Education

BIOL 130 General Biology I (4 credits)

This course is designed to introduce science majors to the major generalizations in biology. Topics include the scientific method, the chemical and cellular basis of life, energy transformation, DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, and cell division. The laboratory will emphasize hands-on exercises including such topics as data analysis, dissection, taxonomy and classification, and cell division.
<br>
<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week.</i>

BIOL 130 General Biology II (4 credits)

Designed to introduce science majors to fundamental concepts in biology. Topics include: transmission genetics, evolutionary theory, and selected ecological principles along with an examination of science as a process and the distinction between science and religion. The laboratory will emphasize experimental design, genetics, evolution and animal diversity. 

<br>
<i> Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 211 Plant Biology (4 credits)

An introduction to the basic interrelationships of plant structure, function,growth, reproduction, physiology, hormonal regulation and response to external stresses are presented in an evolutionary and ecological context. Plant natural products, their poisonous, medicinal and therapeutic active constituents will be covered. Laboratory will introduce knowledge and methodologies from a number of different disciplines to provide students with an experimental approach from the organismal to the molecular level. 

<br>
<i> Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 320 Genetics (4 credits)

A study of transmission, population, molecular, and cytogenetics. Both in the classroom and the laboratory, the emphasis is on reinforcing basic concepts through a study of the classic experiments in genetics as well as current research. 

<br>

<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 321 Evolution (3 credits)

Topics include the history of evolutionary thought, the origin of life, microevolution, macroevolution, population genetics, speciation, coevolution, and critical periods in the evolution of life. In addition, an examination of social Darwinism, scientific creationism, and review of the race concept will illustrate how one’s culture and values influence scientific investigations. <br> <i>Three hour lecture per week. </i>

Biology Elective Courses (10 credits) (Listed at the bottom of the page)

 At least 10 credits selected from 300-400 level courses in BIOL (at least one of which must be a 4-credit course with a lab) and not including BIOL 390,391 and/or 392. BIOL 360 (Ecology) is strongly recommended. Taking both BIOL 201 and BIOL 202 (Human Anatomy & Physiology I – II) may substitute for one 300-400 level 4-credit BIOL course, but then BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440 may not be taken. Students who take BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440 may not then take BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202.
 Additional courses required for Biology Education majors

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits) 

This course includes the fundamental treatment of the basic research findings and theories comprising the science of psychology. Topics of study include the exploration of the nature, scope, and methods involved in the scientific investigation of human behavior, stressing such topics as learning, emotions, personality, biology, psychopathology, cognition, development and counseling.

PSYC 207 Exceptional Child (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to and study of various special needs populations, such as disability groups and the gifted. Emphasis is placed upon social-psychological and educational perspectives. 

PSYC 318 Psychology of the Adolescent (3 credits)

This course provides a general review of normal adolescent development as well as some common adolescent psychopathology (i.e., substance abuse, eating disorders, depression,). The course is appropriate for individuals planning to teach secondary school and anyone interested in working with adolescents. Discussion involoves how to handle a variety of challenging classroom situations, as well as contemporary views about American youth. Current knowledge of biological, social, sexual, and cognitive development debunk many misconceptions about adolescents.

EDUC 101 Foundation of Education (3 credits)

This course examines the evolution of education in the United States and the role of the teacher in the educational process. Contemporary educational thought and policy are studied, as well as the standards and expectations of the teaching profession, organizational patterns of schools, and the intellectual foundations upon which the practice of education rests. Course content and required fieldwork will assist candidates in assessing their commitment to, and readiness for, teaching.

EDUC 150 Learning Through Technology (3 credits)

This course critically examines the role of technology in the classroom and its application to various teaching and learning needs. Candidates will learn to differentiate among electronic resources to satisfy specific information needs, including analysis of quality and applicability of sources using the resources of the Marist College Library.

EDUC 354 Teaching of Language Arts (3 credits)

This course will address the learning processes and strategies needed to support the literacy development of adolescents. Candidates will explore the theories of reading and writing, instructional materials, planning techniques, remedial strategies, and support practices for the general and special-needs populations. Special emphasis will be placed on the principles of sound teaching for all learners, including English language learners, in an integrated, literature-based classroom. A minimum of 10 hours of fieldwork is required.

EDUC 355 Teaching Language Arts/Content Areas  (3 credits)

This course emphasizes adolescence education teaching methods (grades 7–12) for reading, writing, and study skills in English, mathematics, social studies, science, and other subject areas. Attention is given to: (a) principles of reading and writing processes, (b) techniques that develop learning strategies that facilitate reading, writing, and learning through content areas, (c) assessment practices that analyze text materials and student progress, as well as (d) content area modifications for special-needs students including those who speak English as a second language. A minimum of 10 hours of fieldwork is required.

EDUC 410 Participation/Observation (1 credit)

A field experience which precedes the student teaching semester. Introduces the teacher candidate to the secondary school. Extensive classroom observations, related non-instructional activities, participation in the general activity of the secondary school. Open only to students enrolled in the secondary-education program.

EDUC 422 Methods of Teaching Science (3 credits)

A course concerned with objectives; classroom strategies and procedures; preparation of unit and lesson plans; use of demonstration; student laboratory experiences; science curriculum and evaluation; choosing texts and reference materials; use of visual aids; programs for advanced students; testing; construction and evaluation of classroom tests.

EDUC 464 Student Teaching (12 credits)

Clinical experience in the classroom on the middle school—high school level under the supervision of the Office of Teacher Education. Full-time attendance at a secondary school is required. On-campus seminar sessions. Open only to candidates enrolled in the secondary-education program.

Foreign Language Requirement (3-6 credits)

Student is required to take 3-6 Foreign Language credits.

For additional information including other course requirements, recommended program sequence, pre-requisites,
or the secondary education program, please refer to the catalog.

Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Sciences

BIOL 130 General Biology I (4 credits)

This course is designed to introduce science majors to the major generalizations in biology. Topics include the scientific method, the chemical and cellular basis of life, energy transformation, DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, and cell division. The laboratory will emphasize hands-on exercises including such topics as data analysis, dissection, taxonomy and classification, and cell division.
<br>
<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week.</i>

BIOL 131 General Biology II (4 credits)

Designed to introduce science majors to fundamental concepts in biology. Topics include: transmission genetics, evolutionary theory, and selected ecological principles along with an examination of science as a process and the distinction between science and religion. The laboratory will emphasize experimental design, genetics, evolution and animal diversity. 

<br>
<i> Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 201-202 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II (8 credits) OR

<b>BIOL 201: (4 credits) </b>This course will acquaint students with the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on coordination and adjustment mechanisms. Specific topics include: tissue types, and the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Laboratory exercises are designed to facilitate identification of specific structures and functions in those topics. <br>

<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory per week.</i> <br>

<b> BIOL 202: (4 credits) </b>

This course is a continuation of BIOL 201 and has a greater emphasis on homeostatic imbalances. Specific systems studied in this course include special senses, and the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and reproductive systems. In laboratory, students will locate and identify specific structures and their functions in those systems. <br> <i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory per week.</i>

<br><br>

<i>Students may take BIOL 201 and BIOL 202 or BIOL 340 and BIOL 440. Students who receive credit for BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202 may not then take BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440, and students who receive credit for BIOL 340 and/ or BIOL 440 may not then take BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202.</i> <br>

BIOL 340 Comparative Anatomy and BIOL 440 Vertebrate Physiology (8 credits)

<b> BIOL 340: (4 credits) </b> A comparative study of the organ systems of protochordates and vertebrates. Laboratory includes the dissection of the shark and cat. <br> <i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, each week.</i> <br>

<b> BIOL 440: (4 credits) </b> Basic principles of general animal physiology emphasizing integration of organ system functions to maintain the individual under varying conditions. Control by the nervous and hormonal systems connect all topics which will emphasize the human organism. Topics with special emphasis will include: physiology of excitable cells, muscle physiology, circulation, respiration, fluid and ion balance, and nutrient processing. The laboratory will emphasize experimentation, data analysis, and professional writing. <br>

<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, each week.</i>
<br><br>

<i>Students may take BIOL 201 and BIOL 202 or BIOL 340 and BIOL 440. Students who receive credit for BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202 may not then take BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440, and students who receive credit for BIOL 340 and/ or BIOL 440 may not then take BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202.</i> <br>

BIOL 320 Genetics (4 credits)

A study of transmission, population, molecular, and cytogenetics. Both in the classroom and the laboratory, the emphasis is on reinforcing basic concepts through a study of the classic experiments in genetics as well as current research. 

<br>

<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

SCI 477 Science, Medicine, and Ethics (3 credits)

This course addresses the moral implications of some of the recent advances in science and medicine. Major ethical approaches to making responsible decisions are explained by the case-study method.

HLTH 110 Introduction to Health Professions (1 credit)

This course is designed to introduce students to the various health professions through a series of presentations by health-profession practitioners. Each speaker will give an overview of his or her specific profession, requirements for application to professional school, the nature of professional-school education, daily routine, personal experiences, opportunities, income potential, and other information. A question and answer period will follow the presentation.

BIOL 496 Biomedical Sciences Internship (3 credits)

 The student is required to complete a 3 credit internship for the Biomedical Sciences major.

CHEM 131 General Chemistry I (4 credits)

An introduction to the fundamental theories of inorganic chemistry including the structure of atoms, electronic structure, bonding, reactions in aqueous media, gas behavior, intermolecular forces, and properties of solutions. The laboratory course demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.

CHEM 132 General Chemistry II (4 credits)

An introduction to the principles of physical  chemistry  beginning  with chemical thermodynamics and working through reaction rates, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The lecture and laboratory components of this course are designed to complement each other. Lecture presents background theory while laboratory emphasizes application of theoretical concepts to hands-on discovery.

CHEM 211-212 Organic Chemistry I-II (3 credits each)

This is a two-semester introductory course in organic chemistry. CHEM 211-212 is designed to provide the student with a thorough understanding of the structures, properties, and reactions of organic molecules. The topics of stereochemistry, stability, spectroscopic analysis, reaction mechanisms, and multistep synthesis are emphasized throughout the course.

CHEM 215-216 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I-II (1 credit each)

 This is a two-semester laboratory course designed to accompany the year-long organic chemistry lecture course (CHEM 211-212) that provides students with hands-on experience. Students will learn a variety of important organic chemistry laboratory techniques in the context of  purification  and  purity  assessment, and these techniques are integrated into future labs of increasing complexity. Students will carry out selected reactions studied in lecture, with an emphasis on the purification and characterization of products. Scientific writing is emphasized throughout.

PHYS  211-212 General Physics I and II (6 credits) OR

<b>PHYS 213 General Physics I (3 credits)</b>

A study based on calculus and vector algebra of classical mechanics and sound. <i>Two lectures and one problem session per week.</i> <br><br>

<b>PHYS 214 General Physics II (3 credits)</b>

This course continues the first-level survey of physics with a thorough study of electricity and magnetism, optics, and some aspects of modern physics. An attempt is made to focus on the nature of scientific inquiry and thought. <i>Two lectures and one problem session per week.</i> 

PHYS 201-202 College Physics I and II (6 credits)

<b>PHYS 201- College Physics I (3 credits)</b> :

This is the first course in the sequence of algebra-based Physics. It covers dynamics, rotational motion, energy, momentum, simple harmonic motion, fluid dynamics and thermodynamics. The course will focus on applications relevant to the biological and health sciences. It is strongly suggested that the Physics I laboratory course be taken simultaneously.<br><br>

<b>PHYS 202- College Physics II (3 credits)</b>

This is the second course in the sequence of algebra-based Physics. It covers sound, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics. The course will focus on applications relevant to the biological and health sciences. It is strongly suggested that the Physics II laboratory course be taken simultaneously. 

PHYS 213-214 Physics Lab I-II: Modern Physics Lab (2 credits)

Taken simultaneously with the corresponding lecture course in physics. The lab may or may not be required, depending on the student’s major or program of study (e.g., pre-med, etc). <i>One credit is assigned to each semester of the laboratory.</i>
 For additional information including other course requirements, recommended program sequence, or pre-requisites,
please refer to the catalog.

Biology Minor

BIOL 131 General Biology I (4 credits)

This course is designed to introduce science majors to the major generalizations in biology. Topics include the scientific method, the chemical and cellular basis of life, energy transformation, DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, and cell division. The laboratory will emphasize hands-on exercises including such topics as data analysis, dissection, taxonomy and classification, and cell division.
<br>
<i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week.</i>

BIOL 132 General Biology II (4 credits)

Designed to introduce science majors to fundamental concepts in biology. Topics include: transmission genetics, evolutionary theory, and selected ecological principles along with an examination of science as a process and the distinction between science and religion. The laboratory will emphasize experimental design, genetics, evolution and animal diversity. 

<br>
<i> Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

CHEM 131 General Chemistry I (4 credits)

An introduction to the fundamental theories of inorganic chemistry including the structure of atoms, electronic structure, bonding, reactions in aqueous media, gas behavior, intermolecular forces, and properties of solutions. The laboratory course demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.

CHEM 132 General Chemistry II (4 credits)

An introduction to the principles of physical  chemistry  beginning  with chemical thermodynamics and working through reaction rates, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The lecture and laboratory components of this course are designed to complement each other. Lecture presents background theory while laboratory emphasizes application of theoretical concepts to hands-on discovery.

Biology Electives (3 courses)

<i>Three courses selected from the following with at least one 300-400 level course that must have a lab:</i> <br>

<b>BIOL 203</b> Human Nutrition (3 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 211</b> Plant Biology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 305</b> Animal Behavior (3 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 312</b> Microbiology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 315</b> Immunology (3 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 320</b> Genetics (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 321</b> Evolution (3 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 325</b> Histology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 340</b> Comparative Anatomy (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 360</b> Ecology: Principles & Practice (3 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 390</b> Special Topics in Biology I (1 credit) <br>

<b>BIOL 391</b> Special Topics in Biology II (2 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 392</b> Special Topics in Biology III (3 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 420</b> Invertebrate Zoology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 421</b> Parasitology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 430</b> Developmental Biology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 435</b> Plant Physiology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 440</b> Vertebrate Physiology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 450</b> Biotechnology (4 credits) <br>

<b>BIOL 493</b> Molecular Biology (4 credits) 

 For additional information including other course requirements, recommended program sequence, or pre-requisites,
please refer to the catalog.


Biology Elective Courses

BIOL 305 Animal Behavior (3 credits)

A study of animal behavior from the ethological perspective. Topics include the history of the study of behavior, the physiological basis of behavior, learning and instinct, behavioral ecology, orientation and migration, communication, mate selection, and sociobiology. <i>Three-hour lecture per week.</i>

BIOL 312 Microbiology (4 credits)

An introduction to the vast world of bacteria, fungi, protists, and viruses. Topics include microbial morphology, metabolism, and genetics, along with the roles of microorganisms in disease, the environment, and industry. The laboratory is an integral part of this course. The emphasis is on perfecting microbiological techniques and on the isolation and characterization of microorganisms from the environment. <i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab per week.</i>

BIOL 315 Immunology (3 credits)

A study of the basic principles of the immune response. The cellular and humoral systems will be analyzed. Topic areas to be covered will include: the biology and chemistry of the immune response, complement fixation, immunodiagnoses, immunoassay, immunopathology, autoimmunity, transplant and cancer immunology. <br> <i>Three-hour lecture per week.</i>

BIOL 321 Evolution (3 credits)

Topics include the history of evolutionary thought, the origin of life, microevolution, macroevolution, population genetics, speciation, coevolution, and critical periods in the evolution of life. In addition, an examination of social Darwinism, scientific creationism, and review of the race concept will illustrate how one’s culture and values influence scientific investigations. <br> <i>Three hour lecture per week. </i>

BIOL 325 Histology (4 credits)

A study of animal tissue organization and types. Tissue microanatomy and recognition are covered in lectures and through student microscopic study. The techniques of histological procedures are taught in the preparation of permanent slides. 

<br><i> Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 327 Fresh Water Ecology (3 credits)

Dual Listed as ENSC 327 <br>

See ENSC 327 for course description.

BIOL 340 Comparative Anatomy (4 credits)

A comparative study of the organ systems of protochordates and vertebrates. Laboratory includes the dissection of the shark and cat. Students may take BIOL 201 and BIOL 202 or BIOL 340 and BIOL 440. Students who receive credit for BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202 may not then take BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440, and students who receive credit for BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440 may not then take BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202.  <br> Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 360: Ecology: Principles & Practice (4 credits)

 Dual Listed as ENSC 360 <br>
Study of interrelationships among organisms and with their environments. Topics include organism responses to physical and chemical conditions, population growth and regulation, intra- and interspecific competition, herbivory, predation, parasitism, mutualism, community structure, ecosystem productivity, nutrient cycling, and decomposition. <br> <i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory, per week. </i>

BIOL 420 Invertebrate Zoology (4 credits)

Invertebrate Zoology is a demanding course that focuses on animals lacking backbones, methodologies for their study, and the relationships that invertebrates have with their environments. Groups studied include sponges, mollusks, crustaceans, worms, arachnids, insects (the most diverse of all), starfish & kin. Lectures emphasize morphology, evolution, and ecology. Laboratories include dissections, observations of preserved and living specimens, and collecting field trips. A large field component is obligatory and challenges students to explore their personal field skills. Students will need to pay their travel expenses. <br> <i>A single three-hour lecture/laboratory per week and an approximately ten-day field trip.</i>

BIOL 421 Parasitology (4 credits)

A study of the biology of parasites of man and other vertebrates. Discussion will include types of parasites, life cycles, pathology caused by parasitism, cure and treatment, and the social and economic impact of parasitism. Laboratory work will study the parasite from slide preparations. <br><i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory per week.</i>

BIOL 430 Developmental Biology (4 credits)

 A study of the principles of growth and development in vertebrates. Emphasis in laboratory is placed on amphibian and chick development. <br><i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory per week.</i>

BIOL 435 Plant Physiology (4 credits)

An advanced study of the dynamic processes of growth, metabolism, and eproduction in living plants. Topics will include enzyme kinetics; gene expression and protein turnover; water relations; nutrition; physiological and ecological considerations of photosynthesis; stress physiology; secondary defense metabolites; response of herbivores to toxic secondary compounds; physiology and biochemistry of hormones; development and biochemistry and physiology of phytochrome. Lecture topics are supplemented with weekly laboratory experiments, giving students an in-depth understanding of concepts and hands-on experience in modern laboratory techniques. <br><i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory per week.</i>

BIOL 440 Vertebrate Physiology (4 credits)

 Basic principles of general animal physiology emphasizing integration of organ system functions to maintain the individual under varying conditions. Control by the nervous and hormonal systems connect all topics which will emphasize the human organism. Topics with special emphasis will include: physiology of excitable cells, muscle physiology, circulation, respiration, fluid and ion balance, and nutrient processing. The laboratory will emphasize experimentation, data analysis, and professional writing. Offered every fall. Students may take BIOL 201 and BIOL 202 or BIOL 340 and BIOL 440. Students who receive credit for BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202 may not then take BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440, and students who receive credit for BIOL 340 and/or BIOL 440 may not then take BIOL 201 and/or BIOL 202. <br><i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory per week.</i>

BIOL 450 Biotechnology (4 credits)

An intensive laboratory course covering both basic and advanced techniques in biotechnology. Subcloning, gel electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) will be emphasized. Other techniques will be covered, such as sequencing, DNA and protein blotting, protein isolation, and bioinformatics. Students will apply their skill to a group project. Students will also learn how to find employment or graduate programs in molecular biology. The hands-on advanced nature of this course demands a substantial time commitment outside of normal lecture/lab hours. <br><i>Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory per week.</i>

 

 

For additional information  please refer to the catalog.

 

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