Sports Comm. students take 2nd in national case study competition

Also present on the launch of "The Classroom," Marist's sports radio program on ESPN 1220

POUGHKEEPSIE (May 2, 2014) – A team of four Marist College sports communication students placed second in this year's undergraduate case study competition held by the College Sports Research Institute (CSRI) at the University of South Carolina in Columbia as part of the institute's annual academic conference on intercollegiate athletics from April 23-25. This marks the fourth consecutive year that a Marist team has placed in the top two teams, having won the competition in 2011 and 2013.

Marist's team of four sports communication students -- senior Sarah Cordeiro (far right, below), juniors Caitlin Kelly (2nd from right) and Rob Duffy (left), and sophomore Kevin Bruckner (2nd from left) -- competed against seven other teams from colleges and universities from around the U.S. and Canada. Kelly was also a member of last year’s winning team. This year’s case asked teams to evaluate the gap in spending on student athletes compared to their peers outside of college sports. Sports Communications Case Competition

Case study coordinator Landon Huffman of the University of Tennessee was impressed with Marist’s continued success. "The level of competition in the CSRI case study competition was extremely high," Huffman said. "The Marist team has set the bar very high in this competition in the past, and they were extremely close to bringing home another title this year."

Three of the four team members (Cordeiro, Duffy, and Kelly) were also part of an academic panel that presented at the CSRI conference. These students, all interns for the Marist College Center for Sports Communication, joined center director Dr. Keith Strudler in a 75-minute presentation that focused on the center’s launch of "The Classroom,"  a weekly radio program, which airs on ESPN 1220 of the Hudson Valley. Collectively, they discussed the successes and challenges of running a professional sports radio show from an academic center in partnership with an ESPN affiliate. During the presentation, students discussed their particular roles in the broadcast and what they’ve learned in the process.

Strudler, who also served as the faculty advisor for Marist’s case study team, was pleased with both the panel and Marist’s performance in the case study competition.

"The students worked really hard and made some excellent deductions on the state of college sports," Strudler said, "and they continued the legacy of success of Marist sports communication students in this competition, affirming the high caliber of students that come to Marist to study this discipline."

For the competition, teams had to successfully complete two parts of the case study project. First, they wrote and submitted, in advance, a written case study on spending in college sports. Second, students gave a 10-minute presentation on the divergent habits of different schools. This was followed by questions from faculty judges. Teams were scored on their performance in all aspects.

For more information about CSRI's case study competition, go to csriconference.org. For more information about the Marist College Center for Sports Communication, visit sportscomm.marist.edu.

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