Entrepreneurship

School of Management

Marist students are self-motivated and are focused on turning their ideas into reality. As an Entrepreneurship student at Marist, you’ll ensure the odds are in your favor by learning what it takes to bring an idea from concept to product, and then applying that theory into practice long before you graduate.

The classes aren’t solely lecture-based. Sometimes they’re more like a conversation, and the professors really want to know your opinion. And doing the 3 Day Startup program was the coolest thing I did at college.
I liked listening to and meeting the speakers that came to our classes. We don’t just learn theories, but we hear stories from people who work in the field — what they’re doing, how they’re doing it, the challenges they face. That personal perspective helps me learn.
The entrepreneurship program is a blend of everything: marketing, finance, accounting and human resources. Creating a business plan and presenting it to actual investors really pushed me to understand the complexity involved in building a business. It’s great practice for real life.
For my capping class, we had the task of analyzing Starbucks and developing a strategic plan to make it more competitive, and my role on the team was financial analysis.

An Innovative Curriculum

Along with the courses you’ll take in the Business Administration major, the entrepreneurship concentration includes classes in:

  • Entrepreneurship — Examine topics related to developing successful business ideas and creating, managing, and growing an entrepreneurial firm.
  • Innovation Management and New Product Development — Learn how to develop new products and services and manage the innovation process.
  • Advanced Topics in Entrepreneurship — An in-depth examination of entrepreneurship topics including starting new businesses, financing strategies, supply chain and inventory management, and staffing challenges.
  • Finance for Entrepreneurs — Focus on the financial challenges that entrepreneurs face, such as raising startup funds, customer acquisition costs, cash and receivables management, and liability issues.

Image of students taking notes at a business presentation.

An Innovative Curriculum

Along with the courses you’ll take in the Business Administration major, the entrepreneurship concentration includes classes in:

  • Entrepreneurship — Examine topics related to developing successful business ideas and creating, managing, and growing an entrepreneurial firm.
  • Innovation Management and New Product Development — Learn how to develop new products and services and manage the innovation process.
  • Advanced Topics in Entrepreneurship — An in-depth examination of entrepreneurship topics including starting new businesses, financing strategies, supply chain and inventory management, and staffing challenges.
  • Finance for Entrepreneurs — Focus on the financial challenges that entrepreneurs face, such as raising startup funds, customer acquisition costs, cash and receivables management, and liability issues.

Not every college student receives a special shout-out in the State of the County address, but then again, not every college student is Dana Jones ’20. Jones is an entrepreneur, innovator, and master networker who launched a business called Accessadoor, a phone app that breaks down barriers by making doors more accessible to those with disabilities. Since transferring to Marist from Dutchess Community College (DCC) as a Business Administration major with a concentration in entrepreneurship, Jones has further developed Accessadoor, which is soon to begin a beta-testing phase on 150 doors across the campuses of Marist, DCC, and the Culinary Institute of America, as well as in several buildings owned by Dutchess County.

Read Dana’s Story

Not every college student receives a special shout-out in the State of the County address, but then again, not every college student is Dana Jones ’20. Jones is an entrepreneur, innovator, and master networker who launched a business called Accessadoor, a phone app that breaks down barriers by making doors more accessible to those with disabilities. Since transferring to Marist from Dutchess Community College (DCC) as a Business Administration major with a concentration in entrepreneurship, Jones has further developed Accessadoor, which is soon to begin a beta-testing phase on 150 doors across the campuses of Marist, DCC, and the Culinary Institute of America, as well as in several buildings owned by Dutchess County.

Read Dana’s Story

Where Theory Meets Practice

Marist’s approach to all programs creates a unique balance of theory and practice, and the entrepreneurship program is no exception. Alongside coursework, entrepreneurship students have a number of opportunities for hands-on experience to provide an edge when they enter the workforce:

  • Startup Weekend: Students progress from product idea to final pitch in one weekend.
  • NYS Business Plan Competition: Students vie for seed money in this new-venture contest.
  • Bloomberg terminals: Utilize real-time financial data in our Investment Center.
  • Hudson Valley Startup Fund: Meet face-to-face with entrepreneurs and investors.

Image of a student presenting a project during the Mid-Hudson Regional Business Plan competition.

Where Theory Meets Practice

Marist’s approach to all programs creates a unique balance of theory and practice, and the entrepreneurship program is no exception. Alongside coursework, entrepreneurship students have a number of opportunities for hands-on experience to provide an edge when they enter the workforce:

  • Startup Weekend: Students progress from product idea to final pitch in one weekend.
  • NYS Business Plan Competition: Students vie for seed money in this new-venture contest.
  • Bloomberg terminals: Utilize real-time financial data in our Investment Center.
  • Hudson Valley Startup Fund: Meet face-to-face with entrepreneurs and investors.

At Marist, we pride ourselves on our dedication to providing our students with a well-rounded liberal arts education that prepares them for practical experience and profound success in their field. But don't just take our word for it - the numbers speak for themselves.

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Of current students are satisfied with their Marist Experience

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Graduation rate, higher than the average for public and private colleges

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Employed or attending grad school 6 months after graduation

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Top 50 "Colleges That Create Futures"

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Top Regional Universities-North

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"Best Colleges"